Steve Happ Photography Ramblings and dissertations

November 8, 2009

BirdingOz PhotoTwitch 091108

Filed under: Birds — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:59 pm

BirdingOz PhotoTwitch – 8th November 2009.

Today was the first BirdingOz PhotoTwitch. The idea is that you have photograph as many different bird species in 8 hours as you can. I started off at 7am at Galgabba Point at Swansea, which is south of Newcastle on the shores of Lake Macquarie. The day was not the best as it was overcast and rain was threatening. I started off with a couple of common birds on the street and then moved into the bush. There were a couple of good birds in there that I saw such as Australasian Figbird, Spotted Pardalote, Fan-tailed Cuckoo, Mistletoebird and Olive-backed Oriole. I was hoping to see the gorgeous White-bellied Sea-eagle that sometimes roosts at the end of the point, but she was not available for sessions. In all I photographed about 25 bird species around the Swansea area.

I then drove to Belmont South and walked across the road to Belmont Lagoon and walked along Cold Tea Creek. There were a few egrets around and about half a dozen Bar-tailed Godwits were feeding in the lagoon on a sandbar just before where the lagoon drains into Cold Tea Creek. They looked pretty skinny so maybe they had just arrived from Alaska. Further up the track I spotted a Shining Bronze-cuckoo, some White-breasted Woodswallows, Rufous Whistler, Little Grassbird and this fabulous Eastern Shrike-tit.

Eastern Shrike-tit
Eastern Shrike-tit (Falcunculus frontatus)

It started rain as I got back to the car, same as it did at Swansea. With the rain pelting down, I drove to the Hunter Wetlands Center at Shortland. This is always a good spot, with a wide variety of water birds, as well as a good selection of bush birds and raptors. I spotted the water birds as soon as I got there, and went mad photographing Eurasian Coot, Pacific Black Duck, Dusky Moorhen, Purple Swamphen, Grey Teal, Chestnut Teal and Hardhead. It took me a while to get a photo of a Masked Lapwing, as they kept on running away from me. I could hear them, but always too far away. A Whistling Kite obliged by wheeling over, and later on disappeared towards the east with what looked like a Chestnut Teal in its steely grasp.

There were thousands of Australian White Ibis and Cattle Egrets breeding. All of the Cattle Egrets had their “blood nut” breeding plumage well and truly displayed. You can really tell when they are breeding.

Cattle Egret
Cattle Egret (Ardea Ibis)

There were a few bush birds but not that many. This Willie Wagtail was playing with a dragonfly. He would chomp on it for a while, then chuck it down on the ground. Maybe he was tenderising it for the kids.

Willie Wagtail
Willie Wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys)

Of course it started raining again as I finished at the Hunter Wetlands Centre. I drove over to Stockton and went to the boat ramp, where I photographed a Crested Tern, but that was it around the river and beach. I parked under the Stockton Bridge and waited for the rain to stop. There were thousands and thousands of Red-necked Avocet in the lagoon in the middle of the Stockton Sandspit. There were a few hundred Bar-tailed Godwits and a smattering of Red Knots amongst them. The Eastern Curlews were on the grass, as well as a few Black-winged Stilts and a couple of White-faced Herons and Pied Oystercatchers.

And then it was time. I had photographed 70 species of birds in 8 hours. That was pretty good for a learner, I thought. Grant had got 85 birds which was a spectacular result, I reckon. Here is my list of birds in taxonomic order for a change.

Phototwitch Bird list 8/11/09

Australian Pelican
Little Pied Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Australasian Grebe
Magpie Goose
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Hardhead
Australian Wood Duck
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
Eurasian Coot
White-faced Heron
Cattle Egret
Great Egret
Little Egret
Intermediate Egret
Australian White Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Eastern Curlew
Bar-tailed Godwit
Red Knot
Curlew Sandpiper
Pied Oystercatcher
Masked Lapwing
Red-capped Plover
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Silver Gull
Crested Tern
Whistling Kite
Rock Dove
Spotted Turtle-dove
Crested Pigeon
Galah
Eastern Rosella
Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Shining Bronze-cuckoo
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Little Wattlebird
Striped Honeyeater
Bell Miner
Lewin’s Honeyeater
White-cheeked Honeyeater
Eastern Shrike-tit
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Olive-backed Oriole
Australasian Figbird
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-breasted Woodswallow
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Welcome Swallow
Australian Pipit
Australian Reed-warbler
Little Grassbird
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
Common Starling
Common Myna

Resources:

Field Guide to the Birds of Australia (Helm Field Guides)

Australia: An Ecotraveler’s Guide

November 7, 2009

Eastern Koel

Filed under: Birds — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:36 am

Eastern Koel

Classification
Class: Aves
Order: Cuculiformes
Family: Cuculidae
Genus: Eudynamys
Species: orientalis

The Eastern Koel (Eudynamys orientalis) is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. They are found in forest, woodland, plantations and gardens from Wallacea (Eastern Indonesian islands – suluwesi, moluccas, ambon, flores, timor etc) east to the Solomon Islands and south to Northern and Eastern Australia.

They arrive in New South Wales around October, flying in from the northern rainforests of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. They leave Australia about March to go back north. Female Eastern Koels lay eggs in the nests of several host birds who incubate and feed the birds when they hatch. Once hatched, the Eastern Koel chick pushes the other eggs and hatchlings out of the nest.

Christidis and Boles(2008) have followed Mason (1997) in their taxonomy by recognizing two separate species of Koel – the Eastern Koel (Eudynamys orientalis) and the Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopaceus) which ranges from southern Asia through to the lesser Sundas and Philippines.

The male Eastern Koel has glossy blue-black plumage and a red eye.

male Eastern Koel
male Eastern Koel

The female is glossy brown above with white spots and bars. She has a back face and black on the top of her head, with a red eye. The underparts are creamy brown with fine black bars.
female Eastern Koel
female Eastern Koel
Young Eastern Koel are similar to the adult female, but have a dark eye.

And, to top it all off, I have found a poem by Ivan Carswell.

Koel

the vibrant call comes shrill
and haunting in – a male
Koel’s heartrending voice
retells at night a cuckoo’s choice
distressed with poignancy

no-one is completely free
of omnipresent anguish he
expresses well in simple notes
repetitive from loft of tree –
one rarely sees the red-eyed bird

we know for whom his calls
beseech – a fleeting rainbird’s
raiment drifts in mist that cools
at dawn’s debouche – and there
she flits, trills a shy reply

© 22 September 2008, I. D. Carswell

Sources: ozanimals.com, wikipedia, Christidis and Boles(2008)

Resources:

Field Guide to the Birds of Australia (Helm Field Guides)

Australia: An Ecotraveler’s Guide

November 6, 2009

Newnes Bird Photography 091102

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Newnes Bird Photography – 2nd and 3rd November, 2009

The road down into the Wolgan Valley is about as steep as it gets. I dread going back up it this afternoon. The scenery is magnificent with wild bush and steep cliffs surrounding the valley. I was nearly at the camp site and I saw a Superb Lyrebird on the side of the road. I stopped and was going to get the camera out but it took off. Luckily today I saw another one at the ruins track and got a record shot of one.

I set up my camp and then the storm clouds started gathering, and then, wouldn’t you know it, it started hailing down in bucket loads. After the hail stopped later on in the afternoon, I went for a wander around the camp ground looking for the Pipeline track that goes to Glen Davis. I could not find it anywhere.

There were some Australian Wood Duck and Masked Lapwings on the flat, and further on towards the river crossing to the ruins track there were lots of Superb Fairy-wrens. On the track to the ruins I saw quite a few thornbills, a pardalote or two, a Rufous Whistler and a White-throated Treecreeper.

After I had my dinner, I was just sitting there relaxing and I hear this muzzling sound, sort of like chomp chomp. So I looked over there was this great big Wombat chewing on the gras, not ten meters away from me. I watched him for a while as he ambled along munching on plants as he went. Later on during the night I heard a big bump and a scuffle. The wombat had head-butted my van and wanted to have a fight with it I think.

This morning I got up late, again! I am getting slack lately. It was all foggy and you could not see anything. I took off eventually towards the ruins track and half way there I spotted a White-winged Chough nest with a few chicks being fed. So I climbed up the hill a bit to get a better look and sat there for a while watching the adults feed the chicks. I think there were three.

White-winged Choughs
White-winged Chough chicks screaming for a feed

White-winged Choughs
An adult brings a grub, I saw one later with a Witchetty Grub

White-winged Choughs
Open up, greedy guts!

White-winged Choughs
There it goes, down the hatch, yum yum.

Then, around the ruins, I saw a Superb Lyrebird, but only got record shots. They are very nervous and skittish birds. I eventually found the Pipeline Track when I forded the river, so I followed it back to the camp. Along the way I saw some Silvereye, Eastern Spinebill, Eastern Yellow Robin and juvenile White-browed Scrubwren.

Newnes Bird List 2-3/11/2009.

Superb Lyrebird
Australian Magpie
Eastern Yellow Robin
Masked Lapwing
Australian Wood Duck
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Fantail Cuckoo (H)
Noisy Friarbird
Welcome Swallow
Superb Fairy-wren
Red-browed Finch
Pied Currawong
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Common Bronzewing
White-throated Treecreeper
Rufous Whistler
White-winged Chough
Eastern Spinebill
Silvereye
White-browed Scrubwren

Glen Davis Bird Photography 091101

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Glen Davis Bird Photography 1st November 2009.

After I got all my photos up to date and had all my stories written, I headed off to Glen Davis from Rhylstone. Most of the way is tarred and it is quite a pleasant drive. There is only a bit of dirt at the end so that was OK. Glen Davis itself is set at the end of a valley surrounded by tall cliffs. The camping ground is excellent, so it was all looking good. I was very tired so I was going to have the afternoon off, but a House Sparrow kept jumping in front of me wanting my attention, so I finally relented and got the camera out, and then he racked off into the bushes as soon as I pointed the camera at him.

I am glad I did rouse myself and have a walk around the camping area, because it was excellent value. A posse of White-winged Choughs were at the back of the hall, so I followed them up the hill and found some Dusky Woodswallows hanging around in a tree.

Dusky Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow (Artamus cyanopterus)

Walking around some more and further up the road, I turned around and there was a Brown Treecreeper on the road behind me hopping around not three metres away from me. They have a funny hop, they jump with the two legs together as they cannot walk with one leg, then another.

Brown Treecreeper
Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus)

Next amazing event was I was walking around this old building site in the bush and a Variegated Fairy-wren pops up in front of me really close, again. So I had to take his photo, of course.

Variegated Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren (Malurus lamberti)

It was getting dark so I had to go back to the camp. Near my camp a pair of Rainbow Bee-eaters were perched on a tree, jumping on any insects that they saw on the ground.

Rainbow Bee-eater
Rainbow Bee-eater (Merops ornatus)

At one stage one of them had a fight over some insect with a woodswallow. I think they were both going for the insect. What an amazing afternoon. You never know what is going to happen around here.

Rainbow Bee-eater
Rainbow Bee-eaters (Merops ornatus)

As I am writing this at 1pm, the weather has turned very hot. The air is still and calm and it is very very hot.

Dusky Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow (Artamus cyanopterus)

This morning I got up late – 7am. And I got started late so it was getting hot already by the time I had started. I went for a look around the roads surrounding the camping area to try and find the track to Wolgan Valley. The birds were incredibly quiet, maybe they knew we were in for a scorcher and stayed in their nests for the day. I managed to spot a female King Parrot, Brown Treecreeper, Dusky Woodswallow and an Olive-backed Oriole. This Superb Fairy-wren got a nice insect for his dinner. yum yum.

Superb Fairy-wren
Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

I did eventually find the pipeline track to Newnes and found a lot of Brown Treecreepers on a ridge above the start of the track.

Brown Treecreeper
Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus)

There was a fledgling Brown Treecreeper sitting on the edge of a log, crying out to be fed.

Brown Treecreeper chick
Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus)

I walked the pipeline track as far as the cairn and then turned back. That was enough for me. I went back to the camp. This little Jacky Winter was hanging around near my camp. She was looking at me weird.

Jacky Winter
Jacky Winter (Microeca fascinans)

The adult looked much more normal to me.

Jacky Winter
Jacky Winter (Microeca fascinans)

This morning was very quiet indeed.

Glen Davis bird list

House Sparrow
Noisy Friarbird
White-winged Chough
Brown Treecreeper
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Eastern Yellow Robin
Variegated Fairy-wren
Superb Fairy-wren
Laughing Kookaburra
Rainbow Bee-eater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Willy Wagtail
Australian King-parrot
Dusky Woodswallow
Olive-backed Oriole
Crested Pigeon
Peaceful Dove
Jacky Winter

Dunns Swamp Bird Photography 091031

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Dunns Swamp Bird Photography – 31st October to 1st November.

Mudgee was chock-a-block and it was Saturday morning. I had no idea why there were so many people around. Maybe the races were on. I hit the bank, did some shopping and go the hell outta there. I did get a good Mudgee Bird Routes pamphlet from the Tourist Information Centre. I will have to come back another time to check it out. Maybe not on a weekend.

White-eared Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater (Lichenostomus leucotis)

I headed on to Rhylstone where I washed my clothes, charged my batteries and headed off to Dunns Swamp which is in the dreaded Wollemi National Park. 🙁 There were heaps of people camped there. I followed the Weir Walk which goes along the edge of the river. A Purple Swamphen walked past me nonchalantly in the car park and a little bit later a Rufous Whistler was belting out a tune despite being surrounded by hundreds of humans. The only other water birds I saw were a Eurasian Coot and a Little Black Cormorant.

White-eared Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater (Lichenostomus leucotis)

I did see a Dollarbird flying over the water but the photos all came out blurry. Right now I can see a few Welcome Swallows darting around over the water. The only other things of note were a Noisy Friarbird and a New Holland Honeyeater feeding on the red blossoms. Right now a pair of pair of Purple Swamphen are picking away in the sand just below my picnic table as I am writing.

Darter
Darter (Anhinga melanogaster)

Chapter Two followeth forthwith. Next morning I set out at 6:45am and took the Waterside Walk, which goes along the other side of the river. There were a good number of White-eared Honeyeaters around as well as Noisy Friarbird who serenaded me quite nicely thank you very much. Also lots of Brown Thornbills and Rufous Whistlers and I did manage to spot a Red-browed Finch, some Superb Fairy-wrens and a pair of Crimson Rosella.

White-throated Treecreeper
White-throated Treecreeper (Cormobates leucophaeus)

And then, back to Rhylstone to buy some bread, write these rants up, wash the socks and head off for Capertee Valley this afternoon.

Dunns Swamp bird list 31/10/09 and 1/11/09

Purple Swamphen
Rufous Whistler
Eurasian Coot
Dollarbird
Brown Thornbill
Crimson Rosella
Noisy Friarbird
New Holland Honeyeater
Musk Duck, male
Little Black Cormorant
Welcome Swallow
Willy Wagtail
White-faced Heron
Eastern Yellow Robin
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Darter
Grey Fantail
Laughing Kookaburra
Australian Reed-warbler
Superb Fairy-wren
Red-browed Finch
White-throated Treecreeper

Munghorn Gap NR Bird Photography 091030

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Munghorn Gap Nature Reserve Bird Photography – 30th to 31st October, 2009.

Honeyeater Flats

The trip out the Goulburn River National Park was much shorter than the way in. It always is when it is the first time you go to a remote place. I stopped at Wollar to get some fuel and fill up with water, then off up the road towards Mudgee via the Munghorn Gap Nature reserve.

Common Bronzewing
Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera)

I found Moolarben Picnic Area but it was not where I wanted to go just yet. A quick look at the map and back down the road I went to Honeyeater Flats. I parked the van under a tree and later on it started to rain. After the rain stopped, I went out for a look around. As per usual the White-winged Choughs were fighting with the magpies regarding territory – ho hum, same old same old. Then I just happened to see an emu, so I took a few photographos of it thinking I had not photographed one before in the wild. But I remembered that I had some record shots of them at Macquarie Marshes.

Emu
Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

I walked up this old creek bed and found an old cave at the end of it. Down on the flat, I found some native bees and their hive in a little cave in a big rock. On the flat, there were Eastern Rosellas, Galahs, Noisy Miners and Crested Pigeons feeding on the ground.. and then it started raining again, doh!

Galah
Galah (Eolophus roseicapilla)

The next morning while I was having breakfast, an emu and his five chicks walked past. Yesterday a Red-bellied Black Snake crawled out from under my van and frightened the living hell out of me. After breakfast I went for a walk around Honeyeater Flats. It was damp and misty and the light was horrendous. I saw a White-throated Treecreeper, a Mistletoebird, a King Parrot and his green queen.

Australian King-Parrot
Australian King-Parrot – male (Alisterus scapularis)

Moolarben Picnic Area

After that lameness I drove down Moolarben Road but saw nothing. Moolarben Picnic Area was the pick of the lot this morning. I spied this rather plump Rainbow Beeeater on a tree not liking the cold very much. I went for a walk around the paddock and saw quite a few thornbills – either/and Buff-rumped or Yellow-rumped Thornbills. The standard Eastern Yellow Robin had a good look at me, making sure to strike a pose at the same time. (posers)

ID needed
female Mistletoebird

Then I went for a walk along the track that goes up the hill. Not much, but on the way down I saw a pair of Peregrine Falcons in the tree top going “meep meeep meep”. Back down on the flats I spotted the resident Rufous Whistler and a Sacred Kingfisher.

ID needed
female Mistletoebird

I finished off Mungbean Gap, whoops , sorry Munghorn Gap with a walk to Castle Rock – very boring and dead. All I saw were three Pied Currawongs who were stalking me for a while.

Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill

Munghorn Gap bird list 30-31/10/09

White-winged Chough
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Eastern Rosella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Willy Wagtail
Emu + 5 chicks
Grey Fantail
Noisy Friarbird
Laughing Kookaburra
Noisy Miner
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Galah
White-throated Treecreeper
Mistletoebird
Australian King-parrot
Rainbow Beeeater
Buff-rumped Thornbill
Eastern Yellow Robin
Silvereye
Superb Fairy-wren
Peregrine Falcon
Rufous Whistler
Sacred Kingfisher
Pied Currawong

Goulburn River NP Bird Photography 091029

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Goulburn River National Park Bird Photography, 29th to 30th October, 2009.

They should rename the Wollemi National Park to the Wollemi Desert, it is so dead. Every time I have been there it has been devoid of bird life. Except for the Pied Currawongs that wanted to steal my breakfast and some cockatoos, that was it at Honeysuckle Creek as I packed up and headed off to the Goulburn River National Park.

I had no idea how to get there and luckily saw the sign at Wollar. The road in is pretty horrendous. When I got to Spring Gully camp it was worth it. There is a terrific camping spot by the river with a wonderful view of some cliffs along the river. There were heaps of Welcome Swallows flying around so I tried to get some photos of them. Not very successfully, but maybe some will be usable(no they weren’t).

Butterfly and Bee
Monarch Butterfly and Bee

I went for a walk along the river and it was hard going at times. There were a few ducks and some Little Pied Cormorants. There were quite a few carp in the river. I also saw some at Bowmans Crossing in the Hunter River. They really are a major problem.

I ended up at a dead end along the river and could not get any further so I came back and climbed up to the top of the bank where I spotted some male and female Rufous Whistlers singing up a storm. hmmm, I am not sure if female Rufous Whistlers sing or not. Must find that out.

Buff-rumped Thornbill
Buff-rumped Thornbill

Later on this afternoon I am going to walk to Big River camp – you need a four wheel drive to get there – ooh aah. Hopefully I will see more this afternoon because it has been a bit light on so far. 🙁

A bit better but still not brilliant. I walked from the Spring Gully camp to the Big River camp later on that afternoon. I saw a few birds along the first part of the track, like Laughing Kookaburra, Pied Currawong. And then I spotted an Olive-backed Oriole and a Mistletoebird.

Olive-backed Oriole (Oriolus sagittatus)

On top of the ridge near the Kellys Gap Fire Trail a pair of magpies were defending their territory from some White-winged Choughs.

When I got to the Big River camp I saw lots of either Noisy Miners or Yellow-throated Miners. I can’t tell which yet. I have to look at the book. Back at camp a few Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike flew down towards the river and a pair of Jacky Winter bedded down for the night right near my camp. How exciting. 🙂

The next morning I am up early, had breakfast and hot chocolate and I am up the road to the Big River camp. UP the hill I spy a Noisy Friarbird drinking sap from a eucalypt tree. I have never seen that before, but it makes complete sense to me.

Noisy Friarbird
Noisy Friarbird (Philemon corniculatus)

I took the turnoff going in to Kellys Gap Fire Trail. There were quite a few thornbills as well as Rufous Whistlers. There were a colony of White-winged Choughs who were giving the alarm when I approached them. They make this clicking sound with their tongues sort of like the Kalahari Bushmen’s glottal stop. Xhosa I think the language is called.

White-winged Chough
White-winged Chough (Corcorax melanorhamphos)

Goulburn River National Park bird list 29-30/10/09

White-eared Honeyeater
White-browed Scrubwren
Eastern Rosella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Eastern Spinebill
Pacific Black Duck
Little Pied Cormorant
Grey Teal
Rufous Whistler
Welcome Swallow
Magpie-lark
Noisy Miner
Laughing Kookaburra
Pied Currawong
Olive-backed Oriole
Mistletoebird
Australian Magpie
White-winged Chough
White-faced Heron
Crested Pigeon
Noisy Friarbird
Australian Raven
Willy Wagtail
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Jacky Winter
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Grey Fantail
Eastern Yellow Robin

November 5, 2009

Walka Water Works Bird Photography 091028

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Walka Water Works Bird Photography, 28th October 2009.

Musk Duck
Musk Duck – female (Bizuria lobata)

Getting to the Walka Water Works is easy if you follow the signs. The trick is to go towards Maitland from the western end on the roundabout and follow the signs. Then you will be all right. I always get lost coming out of the Walka Water Works and end up in the main street of Maitland. argggh.. the horror. get me outta here.

Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill (Acanthiza chrysorrhoa)

Walka Water Works is an excellent spot for bird watching because you get both water birds and bush birds. There is a good array of your standard water birds like Eurasian Coot, Chestnut Teal, Grey Teal, cormorants, Australasian Grebe, plus you get the added bonus of the Great Crested Grebe – a truly magnificent looking bird. As an added extra extra bonus look out for the Musk Ducks.

Great Crested Grebe
Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus)

As you go around the pond the trees along the shore will be sure to have some lovely bush birds such as the Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Rufous Whistler, Musk Lorikeet, Eastern Rosella and Grey Butcherbird.

c4e-9555
Australasian Grebe (Tachybaptus novaehollandiae)

Every time I go this this one point on the other side of the pond, there are a few Yellow-rumped Thornbills feeding on the grass. There were some there today as well and for an extra special treat there were about half a dozen Red-rumped Parrots feeding on the grass as well.

Red-rumped Parrot
Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

c4e-9597
Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna)

Earlier I had seen what I thought were Little Corellas flying over. But when I got to the other side I saw a pair of Long-billed Corellas feeding on the grass. They are really weird looking birds with their long bills and their saggy eye patches.

Long-billed Corella
Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris)

Doughboy Hollow

I left Maitland behind and headed towars Singleton to find Doughboy Hollow, where some presumed Plumed Whistling Ducks were to be found. I could not find the spot so I called in to the Singleton Tourist Information, where the delightful staff gave me some directions. So I headed back east and about half a kilometre from the car yard there was the sign.

Straw-necked Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis (Threskiornis spinicollis)

So, out of the van I get and there they were. They were a fair way away so I took some photos and then went across the road to see the other side of the swamp/creek. A flock of Plumed Whistling Ducks flew right over me and I was able to photograph them in flight. Lucky, hey?

Plumed Whistling Duck
Plumed Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna eytoni)

After that I went to Bowman’s Crossing near Jerrys Plains but saw only a Great Egret. Somehow I missed Jerrys Plains. I have no idea where it went. Before long I was at Denman so I drove on to just before Sandy Hollow along the Rhylstone Valley Way and stopped at Honeysuckle Creek in Wollemi National Park where I entertained a no-good Pied Currawong with evil intentions upon my dinner.

Walka Water Works bird list 28/10/09

Magpie-lark
Red Wattlebird
Common Myna
Willy Wagtail
Eurasian Coot
Chestnut Teal
Little Pied Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Masked Lapwing
Australasian Grebe
Great Crested Grebe
Spotted Turtle-dove
Royal Spoonbill
Musk Duck (2 females)
Cattle Egret
Superb Fairy-wren
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Pacific Black Duck
Grey Butcherbird
Galah
Rufous Whistler
Australian White Ibis
Australian Magpie
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Red-rumped Parrot
Grey Fantail
Australian Reed-warbler
White-faced Heron
Baillons Crake
Australian Pelican
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Australian Raven
Musk Lorikeet
Noisy Miner
Eastern Rosella
Common Starling
Long-billed Corella

Doughboy Hollow

Plumed Whistling Duck
Purple Swamphen
Darter
Straw-necked Ibis
White-faced Heron
Australian Raven

Bowmans Crossing

Great Egret
Masked Lapwing
Black-shouldered kite

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