Steve Happ Photography Ramblings and dissertations

April 16, 2010

Tallebudgera Creek

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Tallebudgera Creek Conservation Park

The Tallebudgera Creek is on the Southern side of Burleigh Heads. Turn off to the left at the traffic lights before you cross the bridge if you are coming from Coolangatta. It is lucky that these areas along the creeks have been set aside because development along the Gold Coast is going rampant and these little islands of bush are the only bits of wilderness left among a morass of brick veneer suburbs and high rises. But you expect that on the Gold Coast. The wonder of it is that there are still animals and birds living in these conservation parks. End of rant.

Pied Butcherbird
immature Pied Butcherbird

This morning was a bit rainy so I was not sure if I was going to have a dig, but it cleared up eventually. I was tossing up whether to go for a surf or not, but the waves were tiny. meh. Well anyway back to my story. Along the creek I saw a few water birds, egrets, herons, cormorants, gulls, etc. I also spotted two raptor nests within a hundred meters of each other. I think the largest one belonged to some White-bellied Sea-eagles and I saw a pair of Brahminy Kites roosting on the other tree near a nest.

Butterfly
Butterfly

Elanora Wetlands

Further up the raod where the M1 freeway crosses the creek is the Elanora Wetlands. This is just next door to the treatment works. The land care group has done a great job clearing out all the lantana, so congratulations on a job well done! There were mainly bush birds around this section of bush and in one section I saw a few thornbills and gerygones flittering through the trees.

Butterfly
Butterfly

There were more butterflies. I am seeing lots and lots of butterflies, but I am finding it extremely difficult to get a photo of them in flight.

Tallebudgera Creek bird list

Australian White Ibis
Little Black Cormorant
Australian Magpie
Striated Heron
Grey Shrike-thrush
Spangled Drongo
Pied Currawong
Brahminy Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Australian Raven
Black Swan
Little Egret
Silver Gull
Australian Pelican
Sacred Kingfisher
Rock Dove
Noisy Miner
Welcome Swallow
Pied Butcherbird
Brown Thornbill
Grey Fantail
Eastern Rosella
Magpie-lark

April 15, 2010

Terranora Broadwater

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Tweed Heads Birding

The Terranora Broadwater walk is a fairly long walk. I reckon it is about 3 to 5 kilometers one way, and I did not go all the way. It still continues on for how long I do not know. To get there, drive south from Tweed Heads and take the Bilambil turnoff before the bridge. Park somewhere behind the Seagulls club and start walking west and south along the water front. The track passes through sub-tropical rainforest, mangroves and grasslands. I had seen Spangled Drongo and White-bellied Sea-eagles there last night. This morning I heard whipbirds and catbirds as I started off. A Pied Butcherbird sang me a morning song and a huge pelican swooped down to the water.

Sacred Kingfishers
Sacred Kingfishers (Todiramphus sanctus)

A few birds were looking for a feed on the oyster racks out in the bay. The appropriately named Pied Oystercatchers were digging around, as well as a Striated Heron and a Great Egret. Along the track, a bunch of Red-browed Finch came down to peck at the grass seeds. On the way back, a pair of Sacred Kingfishers kept following me along the water front. I could not get rid of them!

Sacred Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher

Some Lewin’s Honeyeaters and Brown Honeyeaters were in competition for the mistletoe blossoms. I did not see any Mistletoebirds, but they would have been shooed off anyway. The Terranora Broadwater is well worth a visit. Especially in spring, when it must come alive. There are a variety of habitats, so there are a good range of birds.

Terranora Broadwater bird list

Spangled Drongo
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Eastern Whipbird (H)
Green Catbird (H)
Willy Wagtail
Australian Pelican
Pied Butcherbird
Pied Oystercatcher
Australian Raven
Bar-shouldered Dove
Striated Heron
Great Egret
Grey Fantail
Australian Figbird
Red-browed Finch
Australian Magpie
Magpie-lark
Noisy Miner
Rainbow Lorikeet
Silvereye
Sacred Kingfisher
Lewin’s Honeyeater
Brown Honeyeater

April 14, 2010

Tweed Heads Birding

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Letitia Spit

The Letitia spit is south of Tweed Heads and on the spit of sand on the other side of the Tweed River from Coolangatta. To get there, turn off towards Fingal Head and keep going along Letitia Road. There is a narrow patch of bush between the ocean and the river. Tracks criss-cross the area, but watch out because it is very sandy and extremely easy to get bogged. There is a Little Tern nesting site there, so be careful where you put your big feet! 🙂

Minjungbal Aboriginal Nature Reserve

The Minjungbal Nature Reserve is on the other side of the river at South Tweed Heads. Go south along Minjungbal Drive and turn down River Street to the end. There is a track and boardwalk along the water. The boardwalk goes through some mangroves and the track goes through some swampy casuarina country. I spotted quite a few Lewin’s Honeyeaters and actually managed to see an Eastern Whipbird. Some Brown Honeyeaters were feeding on the mistletoe flowers and even chased away some Mistletoebirds when they came near.

Brown Honeyeater
Brown Honeyeater (Lichmera indistincta)

When I went along the mangroves I spotted a couple of lovely Mangrove Gerygone and happened to get a reasonable photo of one. One of them had a worm that he was having for breakfast.

Mangrove Gerygone
Mangrove Gerygone (Gerygone levigaster)

Tweed Heads bird list 14/4/10

Willy Wagtail
Australian White Ibis
Pacific Black Duck
Crested Pigeon
Rainbow Lorikeet
Silver Gull
Osprey
Lewin’s Honeyeater
Eastern Whipbird
Sacred Kingfisher
Mangrove Gerygone
Brown Honeyeater

Kingsliff Bird Photography

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Cudgen Creek

Cudgen Creek is just south of Kingscliff. Turn right before you go over the bridge and park at the end of the track. I followed the creek upstream and then cut across into the paperbark swamp and then finally walked along the rainforest track. There are a few quite diverse habitats along the creek, so its a great place to see a diversity of birds. When I first got there, three Ospreys disturbed my lunch by flying over me, causing me to abandon my sandwiches and grab for the camera. In the park were a bunch of brawling honeyeaters – Noisy Friarbird, Little Wattlebird, Noisy Miner and Blue-faced Honeyeater.

There were no migratory waders at all. I am assuming they have already packed up and headed north to Alaska. In the rainforest section I spotted an immature Spectacled Monarch. It took me a while to work out what it was, because I had never seen one before. I think I had seen one last week in the Border Ranges National Park.

Spectacled Monarch
immature Spectacled Monarch (Monarchus trivirgatus)

I was seeing heaps of butterflies but I have no idea what their names are. These pair were flittering around together. I am assuming they are doing some kind of mating ritual but I really have no idea.

Two Butterflies
Butterflies dancing

Here is another cool looking butterfly that I took a photo of. I just liked the fluorescent blue dots on his wings.

Butterfly
Butterfly

I walked towards the ocean and spotted this Osprey near its nest just beside the Coast Guard Tower. He was having his lunch of fresh mullet but did not stop for me!

Osprey
Osprey feeding on a mullet

Out the end of the breakwater a lot of Crested Terns were hovering and diving for fish. This one came close to me so I had to take its photo.

Crested Tern
Crested Tern

Cudgen Creek bird list

Osprey
White-faced Heron
Magpie-lark
Welcome Swallow
Silver Gull
Australian White Ibis
Rainbow Lorikeet
Masked Lapwing
Little Egret
Noisy Friarbird
Little Wattlebird
Willy Wagtail
Australian RAven
Australian Magpie
White-breasted Woodswallow
Noisy Miner
Blue-faced Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Brush Turkey
Lewin’s Honeyeater
Spangled Drongo
Grey Fantail
Grey Shrike-thrush
Australian Pelican
Brahminy Kite
Pied Heron
Sacred Kingfisher
Great Egret
Crested Tern
Spectacled Monarch

April 11, 2010

Rocky Creek Dam

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Rocky Creek Dam

The Rocky Creek Dam supplies water to Lismore, Byron Bay and the surrounding areas. To get there from Lismore head out along the road to Dunoon. Carry on to the road to Mullumbimby for four kilometers and turn left for the dam. It is a very pleasant spot for a walk or a picnic, so bring the picnic basket as well as the binoculars. Here is a wide angle shot of the dam taken on the point and shoot camera.

Rocky Creek Dam
Rocky Creek Dam

When I got there I walked towards the dam wall and saw a kookaburra and some Noisy Miners. A mob of Masked Lapwings and a few White-faced Herons were on the road over the dam wall and flew off shrieking when I came across. Quelle surprise! I have seen quite a few figbirds in the area, so there must be lots of trees with fruit on them. There were not a lot of water birds on the dam, just some Dusky Moorhens and a couple of Pacific Black Ducks. I have also seen a few White-headed Pigeons in the Lismore area.

I was quite surprised to see about four Spangled Drongos. I thought they would have migrated north by now. I think they head off to Indonesia and New Guinea for the winter. So, summing up, there were not a lot of birds at Rocky Creek. They seem to get up a lot later as well. It was nearly 8 o’clock before there was any action at all.

Rocky Creek Dam bird list

Laughing Kookaburra
Noisy Miner
Masked Lapwing
Australian Magpie
Australasian Figbird
Rock Dove
White-faced Heron
Pacific Black Duck
Dusky Moorhen
White-headed Pigeon
Little Pied Cormorant
Eastern Whipbird
Lewin’s Honeyeater
Grey Shrike-thrush
Spangled Drongo
Willy Wagtail
Pied Butcherbird
Eastern Rosella

April 10, 2010

Tucki Tucki Creek

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Richmond Birdwing Butterfly Gully

Tucki Tucki Creek runs through the Richmond Birdwalk Butterfly Gully reserve just out of Lismore, in northern New South Wales. To get there, go east on the Bruxner Highway and at the Kadina Street roundabout turn right and it is about 400 meters on the left. When I got there early in the morning, there were heaps of figbirds in the tree above me. A couple of Purple Swamphen and Dusky Moorhen were pecking about along the banks of the creek, and some Rainbow Lorikeets and Scaly-breasted Lorikeets were feeding on some eucalypt blossoms near the bridge.

I kept hearing these splashes and managed to work out that it was Eastern Water Dragons jumping into the creek from branches. They would just go splat into the water on their tummies(i.e. belly floppers). This young one was sticking his head out of the water after a big swim.

Eastern Water Dragon
Eastern Water Dragon

Later on, I got a decent shot of one of these lizards in the sun.

Eastern Water Dragon
Eastern Water Dragon (Physignathus lesueurii lesuerii)

Further up the creek there were lots of magpies and currawongs hanging around the tennis courts. I guess they were waiting for them to open so they could have a game. This Pied Currawong sang me a song while he was waiting.

Pied Currawong
Pied Currawong (Strepera graculina)

The bush regeneration people have done a great job along the Tucki Tucki Creek and it is remarkable that such a great bit of bush is in the middle of suburbia. It is well worth and visit and highly recommended. If you are lucky, you might even see a platypus!

Tucki Tucki Creek bird list

Australian Figbird
Purple Swamphen
Dusky Moorhen
Rainbow Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Superb Fairy-wren
Noisy Miner
Pied Currawong
Australian Magpie
Crested Pigeon
Spotted Turtle-dove
White-headed Pigeon
Australian Wood Duck
Pacific Black Duck
Masked Lapwing
Red-browed Finch
Willy Wagtail
Pied Butcherbird

April 9, 2010

Lismore Bird Routes

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Jabiru Geneebeinga Wetlands, Casino

The Jabiru Geneebeinga Wetlands are just behind the golf course at Casino on the way out of town towards Queensland. I got out there early to have a good look around but there was not much there. The magpies and butcherbirds were singing their early morning songs as I headed off around the swamp. On the golf course there were some Australian Wood Duck and Masked Lapwings, and some Dusky Moorhen were hanging out around a pond. But that was about it. I was pretty disappointed but there is a great habitat there for all sorts of wild life.

Lismore Lake

On the way back to Lismore I stopped in at Lismore Lake, which is a couple of kilometers out of Lismore on the road to Casino. There were quite a few birds on the lake when I got there, mainly Eurasian Coots, Pacific Black Duck and Black Swans. Just in front of where I parked a Little Egret had caught what appeared to me to be a catfish, albeit rather small. He was having a hard time trying to swallow it or kill it and was dropping it and stabbing it and then picking it back up again.

Little Egret
Little Egret (Ardea garzetta)

I walked a little further down to the southern end and then I excitedly spotted a Comb-crested Jacana. I was hoping to see one of these at Casino, but did not. I took heaps of photos because I had not seen one of these before. They have huge feet and seem to lift them up and plonk them down as they walk over the water vegetation.

Comb-crested Jacana
Comb-crested Jacana (Irediparra gallinacea)

I ended up seeing quite a few birds around the lake and was quite pleased with the place. There were lots of Little Egrets in a large flock and quite a few different water birds. I also spotted a Buff-banded Rail and a Black-fronted Dotterel. As for bush birds, there were some White-breasted Woodswallows, Crested Pigeon, Blue-faced Honyeater and Pied Currawong.

Casino wetlands bird list

Australian Magpie
Mapgie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Masked Lapwing
Galah
Australian Raven
Australian Wood Duck
Dusky Moorhen
Noisy Miner
Chestnut Teal

Lismore Lake bird list

Willy Wagtail
Eurasian Coot
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Egret
Australasian Grebe
Little Black Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Crested Pigeon
Comb-crested Jacana
Purple Swamphen
Dusky Moorhen
Buff-banded Rail
White-breasted Woodswallow
Black-fronted Dotterel
Magpie-lark
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Masked Lapwing
Rainbow Lorikeet
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Pied Currawong

April 8, 2010

Border Ranges National Park

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Sheep Station Creek

The Border Ranges National Park are on the western rim of the Mount Warning Caldera. I got there via Tenterfield, Casino, and Kyogle in Northern New South Wales. After Kyogle, you follow the Summerland Way to Wiangaree and then turn right to follow the signs to Border Ranges National Park. For the first walk I followed the Palm Forest Walk which went down the hill to Brushbox falls and then goes up again into denser rainforest. I did a part of the Rosewood Loop but it was getting too late, so I turned around and came back the way I came in. The Palm Forest Walk follows the line of an old bullock track and logging road. Sheepstation Creek camp is at an elevation of about 400 meters above sea level.

I did not see a great deal of birds, mainly Brown Thornbills with a spattering of Eastern Yellow Robin, Lewin’s Honeyeater and Grey Fantail. On the way back I spotted a male and female Satin Bowerbird.

Bar Mountain

The next day I went up to Bar Mountain with Lorna and Graham(thanks). The Bar Mountain Ciruit walking track is 3.5 kilometers long and is said to be “medium difficulty”. It is certainly a difficult walk because the track is fairly steep in parts, so take some food and water. The track winds its way down the ridge towards the western escarpment. There are large New England Blackbutts and Brushbox trees. The forest type varies from cool temperate rainforest to warm temperate rainforest through to wet eucalypt forest.

We saw lots of Brown Cuckoo-doves on the road going up and when we stopped at Forest Tops, we spotted some Pied Currawongs and Satin Bowerbirds. On the Bar Mountain Circuit we think we spotted either a Bassian Thrush or a Russet-tailed Thrush. I had no idea. It only was in view for a couple of seconds and shot off, plus it was pretty dark under the canopy. Looking for birds in rainforests is very difficult in my opinion. And doubly difficult for taking photographs. In fact, its a nightmare for bird photographers. Well, I think it is. 😛 We also saw Eastern Whipbird, Grey Shrike-thrush and a Brush Turkey.

On the Falcorostrum Loop, we saw a pair of Eastern Spinebill. This walk has some incredibly ancient Antarctic Beech trees. Some of these beeches are up to 2000 years old and they were around in the days of Gondwanaland – more than 80 million years ago! How mind-boggling is that? Coming down the mountain, we stopped to take some photos of a Diamond Python who was sunning himself on the road. Then we put him off the road in case someone might run over him.

Diamond Python
Diamond Python

The last morning I managed to take some very crappy photos of some female Paradise Riflebirds. There were a few just flying around the camp at Sheepstation Creek. I did not have to go trudging through the wet dark rainforest at all!

female Paradise Riflebird
female Paradise Riflebird (Ptiloris paradiseus)

Border Ranges National Park bird list

Eastern Yellow Robin
Brown Thornbill
Lewin’s Honeyeater
Grey Fantail
Satin Bowerbird
Australasian Pipit
Brown Cuckoo-dove
Australian King-parrot
Pied Currawong
Brush Turkey
Eastern Whipbird
Eastern Spinebill
Paradise Riflebird

April 5, 2010

HBOC Easter Camp to Borah Creek 2

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Birding at Borah Creek 2.

3rd April 2010.

I was feeling a bit lazy this morning but I eventually managed to get down the creek. I met up with a heap of people going the same way so I wasn’t that slack after all! Down on a reef, we saw some King Parrots, Pied Butcherbirds, Eastern Rosellas and a Common Bronzewing having a drink. There were quite a few different birds coming down for a drink – Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters, Little Friarbirds, Double-barred Finch. Me and Lucky went over to the other side of the creek to get the sun behind us and we got some great photos of Restless Flycatchers hovering and then we had some great views of a Crested Shrike-tit.

Restless Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher

And here is a video of the stills.


Restless Flycatcher hawking for insects

Then, to top it all off, there were a pair of Turquoise Parrots feeding by the creek on some broad leaved grass. We got some fabulous photos.

Turquoise Parrot
male Turquoise Parrot

On the way back to camp we saw a school of small fish in the creek as well as blue-tailed, red-tailed and brown dragonflies. And! to top the morning off, I am trying to have lunch and I get called over to see a Red-bellie Black Snake who was slithering across the rocks and then swam across the creek.

Red-bellied Black Snake
Red-bellied Black Snake

In the afternoon, Bob found a female Turquoise Parrot feeding on a bush with some tiny red fruit. Once again, there were nearly half a dozen photographers snapping away at her. This photo is for Leslie. 🙂

Turquoise Parrot
female Turquoise Parrot

4th April 2010

In the morning I went wandering with Chris and Liz and spotted half a dozen King Parrots near a hole in a tree. We went up the road and spotted a Wedge-tailed Eagle, Grey Goshawk, Eastern Rosella and Blue-faced Honeyeaters.

King Parrot
King Parrot

In the afternoon, I went over the other side of the creek and followed the fence line back to the creek. I got a great shot of the iridescent blue crown of a Restless Flycatcher and some Yellow-rumped Thornbills on a fence.

Restless Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher

This Jacky Winter was having a feed of the grass-hoppers, too!

Jacky Winter
Jacky Winter

Borah Creek bird list, Easter 2010

Brown Treecreeper
White-throated Treecreeper
Magpie-lark
Willy Wagtail
Hooded Robin
Noisy Miner
Noisy Friarbird
Little Friarbird
Brown-headed Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Jacky Winter
Superb Fairy-wren
Diamond Firetail
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
Rufous Whistler
Restless Flycatcher
Tawny Frogmouth
Grey Shrike-thrush
Eastern Yellow Robin
Olive-backed Oriole
Australian Magpie
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Little Corella
Red-winged Parrot
King Parrot
Eastern Rosella
Turquoise Parrot
Pied Currawong
Varied Sitella
Grey Fantail
Tree Martin
White-backed Swallow
Mistletoebird
White-throated Gerygone
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Diamond Firetail
Double-barred Finch
Crested Pigeon
Peaceful Dove
Common Bronzewing
Striated Pardalote
Azure Kingfisher
Pied Butcherbird
Black-fronted Dotterel
Crested Shrike-tit
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Grey Goshawk

Borah Creek Easter Camp

Filed under: Birds — Tags: , , — admin @ 3:26 am

Borah Creek 1

1st April, 2010.

After I got all my shopping done at Manilla, I went for a walk up the street. On the way back, who should I bump into but Bob! I told him I knew an easy way to get to Borah Creek so he was going to follow me, after I had processed all my photos from this morning and uploaded the blog pictures. At the showground, we saw a young Wedge-tailed Eagle fly over and then three Nankeen Kestrels flew over-head of us. Meanwhile the cops had gone past us to look for a motor-bike hellion who was riding along the riverbank reserve.

Varied Sitella
Varied Sitella (Daphoenositta chrysoptera)

Eventually we set off to Borah Creek for the HBOC Easter Camp, via the Boggabri Road and turned right at the Borah Crossing. This way is tarred except for about the last seven kilometres. After setting up camp and having a bit of a rest, digging toilet holes, me getting stung by a bee, we all set off for a look for some birds. There were lots of Brown Treecreepers around and then we spied a Hooded Robin. Luckily I managed to get some shots of it hovering.

Hooded Robin
Hooded Robin (Melanodryas cucullata)

The other thing we saw which took us a while to work out was the Brown-headed Honeyeater. They look similar to the White-naped Honeyeater, but do not have the red around the eye.

Brown-headed Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater (Melithreptus brevirostris)

Then we spotted some Diamond Firetails but it took a while to get a decent shot of them. The other interesting bird was was a Restless Flycatcher. We had heard its particular “scissors grinder” call and then it flew right in front of us and away. After a delicious dinner, we assembled around the camp-fire and did a bird count. All up I think we saw about 44 different species of birds for the day. That night, just as I was getting ready for bed, I spotted Tawny Frogmouth right next to my camp. John got out his torch and I managed to get a photo of it.

Tawny Frogmouth
Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

2nd April 2010

In the morning, after a cold night, we got up and set off before the sun got up over the mountain. I managed to get some fairly average shots of a Fuscous Honeyeater and we saw another Restless Flycatcher. Other birds included Grey Shrike-thrush, Eastern Yellow Robin, Olive-backed Oriole and Noisy Miner, A flock of Corellas flew past and another crew saw a mob of Red-winged Parrots being chased by a Brown Goshawk. 6 Pied Currawongs were hanging out in the biggest mob of them I have ever seen.

After that I took off on my own after a cuppa and some hot cross buns(Thanks Sue) and spotted heaps of little birds. They were everywhere! Varied Sitella, Tree Martins, Mistletoebirds and Yellow-rumped Thornbills. They just kept coming and coming. I did not know where to turn, there were so many birds. I kept on photographing Diamond Firetails, Spotted Pardalote and Double-barred Finch.

Double-barred Finch
Double-barred Finch (Taeniopygia bichenovii)

Eventually I just had to walk away from it. Otherwise, I would have filled up ten cards. Later on by the creek, Roley spotted a Turquoise Parrot and a Peaceful Dove. As I am writing this, I can hear a pair of Restless Flycatchers grinding their scissors. It just never stops.

Around mid-day, someone said that there were was an Azure Kingfisher as well as a goanna eating a kangaroo down the creek, so I trotted off to have a look. Sure enough, we spotted the Azure Kingfisher, but it was way down the creek, then it came flying towards us low and fast downstream and kept going. It was way too fast for a photo, but we got a real good look at it. Further down the creek, we were all assembled watching a goanna stick its head into the carcase of a dead kangaroo. There were about half a dozen photographers and they were all going “click click” madly. It was very gruesome indeed.

Goanna eating Kangaroo
Goanna eating a kangaroo

And here is a video I made from the stills. All the gruesome detail in all its gore.


Goanna feasting on a Kangaroo

Later on in the afternoon, I went looking for quail and Turquoise Parrots in the grass but there were none around so I carried on to a little gully where I saw some Yellow Thornbills and Yellow-rumped Thornbills.

I added a video of the Hooded Robin hawking to youtube. I hope this link works. Its a video from the stills put together in MovieMaker.


Hooded Robin

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