Steve Happ Photography Ramblings and dissertations

January 29, 2010

Narrandera Wetlands Bird Photography

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Narrandera Wetlands

The Narrandera Wetlands are just over the bridge on the way out to Hay and the Sturt Highway. Just turn first right going out of town over the bridge and there you are. The Tourist Information has excellent maps and provide brilliant service. Well the first thing I heard when I started off yesterday afternoon was this crying of a bird. I was looking all over the place for it in the trees. I did not see it until I looked down. And there was this baby bird crying out.

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike baby (Coracina novaehollandiae)

I could not tell what it was until I saw a pair of Black-faced Cuckoo-shrikes hanging around with some food for the poor little mite. I am guessing that the baby chick fell out of the nest. At least it was up a little bit offthe ground on a branch.

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
adult Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike with grasshopper for baby

A little while later I came back and there was a pair of magpies that were near the chick. The adult Black-faced Cuckoo-shrikes were dive bombing the magpies and you could hear a very loud whack! each time they hit the magpies. Eventually after a lot of attacking, the magpies got the hint and moved away. Then dark descended and the moon rose.

Moon

The next morning, the chick was still there but it seemed to have been abandoned by its parents. A local birder came along and said that he will ring WIRES, the animal rescue people, to come and get it. I carried along around the wetlands and saw a few Yellow-billed Spoonbills. We do not usually get them on the coast, they are more an inland bird as far as I know.

Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill (Platalea flavipes)

And as usual there were heaps of Galahs hanging around the paddocks. Because they are so common, one forgets how beautiful they look.

Galahs
Galah (Cacatua roseicapillus)

Oh, and I almost forgot to say that there have been some Little Bitterns seen at the wetlands, but they were not around or I did not see them, doh!

Narrandera Wetlands bird list 29-30/01/10

Galah
Australian Magpie
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Chough
Grey Shrike-thrush
Magpie-lark
Grey Teal
Australian White Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Purple Swamphen
Eastern Rosella
Dollarbird
Pacific Black Duck
Laughing Kookaburra
Whistling Kite
White-faced Heron
Australian Reed-warbler
Australasian Grebe
Yellow Rosella (Platycerus elegans flaveolus)
Common Starling
Australian Wood Duck
Australian Raven

Jugiong on the Murrumbidgee

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Jugiong – Murrumbidgee River

I am on my trek to the South-west of New South Wales. I am heading for Robinvale, on the Murray River, near Mildura. I started out from Newcastle after topping up my phone credit and getting an antenna for my wireless broadband dongle. Hopefully now I might get a better signal out in the bush and can post without having to go into the nearest big town. I didn’t get very far before I had to have a snooze the other side of Sydney. Then I kept going until Goulburn where I fuelled up and headed south along the Hume Highway.

I had a stop at Jugiong which is a tiny little village on the banks of the Murrumbidgee River. There wasn’t much around, just the obligatory Superb Fairy-wrens.

male Superb Fairy-wren
Superb Fairy-wren, male (Malurus cyaneus)

I did hear what I thought were some Purple Swamphens. Or they could have been Dusky Moorhens, I am not real sure about that. There was also a Pied Currawong, a mob of Galahs on the fields, some raucous Sulphur-crested Cockatoos, and a couple of magpies. I did also surprise a White-faced Heron down by the river bank when I went down to have a look.

With not much in the way of birds, I thought I might just take some photos of the Water Striders. These insects are often found floating on still water. The long thin legs of the Water Strider help to spread out their weight. The surface of the water bends into small dips around the end of each leg, but does not break. They communicate with each other by making vibrations and ripples on the water’s surface. They are also called a Pond Skater.
Their taxonomy classification is : Order: Hemiptera, Infraorder: Gerromorpha, Family: Gerridae.

Water Strider
Water Strider (Aquarius antigone)

Sources: “Visual Factfinder: Bugs” by Bardfield Press, anbg.gov.au

January 24, 2010

Hunter Wetlands Centre

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Hunter Wetlands Centre Bird Photography

24th January, 2010.

This morning I finally got out and about so I went to the Hunter Wetlands Centre in Newcastle. It is always a good place to go because there is always something happening. There were ducks and Magpie Geese, coots and swamphen in the main ponds out in front of the visitors centre. But it was very dry, the ponds were almost empty of water. It was a bit strange after all the rain we have been having. A Nankeen Night Heron flew out of a she-oak and surprised me, lucky I was able to get a shot of it.

Nankeen Night Heron
Nankeen Night Heron (Nycticorax calendonicus)

On another ponds a whole heap of Cattle Egrets were congregating and feeding and giving off a nice reflection.

Cattle Egrets
Cattle Egret (Ardea ibis)

Then I ran into a pair of baby egrets. I am not sure which type they were. They looked like they were lost and had been separated from their nest.

Baby Egret
baby egret

This egret was chasing something across the mud flats.

?? Egret
young egret

And this is a slightly older egret than the baby ones.

Cattle Egret I think ?
young egret

There were thousands of Cattle Egrets in the breeding colony. Lots of nests and baby egrets all over the place.

Cattle Egret
Cattle Egret

Hunter Wetlands Centre bird list

Pacific Black Duck
Australian White Ibis
Chestnut Teal
Eurasian Coot
Dusky Moorhen
Little Black Cormorant
Magpie Goose
Purple Swamphen
Black-fronted Dotterel
Masked Lapwing
Grey Teal
Willy Wagtail
Nankeen Night Heron
Royal Spoonbill
Superb Fairy-wren
Australian Magpie
Noisy Miner
White-breasted Woodswallow
Dollarbird
Olive-backed Oriole
Eastern Rosella
Australian Raven
Cattle Egret
Black-winged Stilt
Laughing Kookaburra
Common Myna
Crested Pigeon
Magpie-lark
Wandering Whistling Duck

January 17, 2010

Backyard Birding

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Backyard Birds – Newcastle

17th January 2010

Today I took some shots of animals and birds at the bird feeder in the backyard in Newcastle suburbs. I got the word that there was a Pygmy Possum(It is a Black Rat) in the bird feeder, so I grabbed my camera to get a photo of it. The light was pretty horrendous because a storm was about to strike. In fact it started raining halfway through taking some of these photos. Here is what I think is the Eastern Pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) and is classified as vulnerable in NSW.

Pygmy Possum
Eastern Pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) Black Rat

I took a shot of this Eastern Rosella (Platycercus eximius) because I noticed the black colours in the centers of the yellow feathers on the back. I never noticed them before. I think this is a mature bird because of the off-white coloured bill.

Eastern Rosella
Eastern Rosella

Finally, here is a male Australian King-parrot having a feed at the bird feeder. The adult males have a fully red front whereas females have a green chest and are called Green Queens colloquially.

Australian King-parrot
Australian King-parrot

January 12, 2010

Stockton Sandspit and the Wreck

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Stockton Sandspit and The Wreck

12th January, 2010.

I finished off my adventure to the west with a morning at the Stockton Sandspit. It was high tide and not the best time to be there, but oh well, you can’t win them all. I went down the northern side, and disturbed either a crake or a rail. I couldnt get a photo because I was too surprised to see one at that end. Luckily I was ready when this Mangrove Gerygone flew into the mangroves.

Mangrove Gerygone
Mangrove Gerygone (Gerygone levigaster)

There were a whole bunch of birds on the centre lagoon. A pair of juvenile Pied Oystercatchers with their parents, Black-winged Stilts, Australian White Ibis and two or three hundred Eastern Curlew.

Eastern Curlew
Eastern Curlew (Numenius madagascariensis)

There were a mob of Red-capped Plovers and a flock of Red-necked Stints who later took off and flew west when I surprised them. A group of Red Knots were also grazing on the grassy section in the lagoon. Then I saw another bird watcher, and it was Mark Young, from Sydney. If you go to his blog, he will probably tell you all about the day from a different perspective. I showed him the next bay, which had nothing, so then we went to the wreck along the Stockton foreshore. There were a few Pacific Golden Plover and an entourage of Grey-tailed Tattlers sitting on the rusting hulk.

Pacific Golden Plover and Grey-tailed Tattlers
Pacific Golden Plover and Grey-tailed Tattlers

We took a few photos and then I spotted this White-faced Heron who had caught a prawn. “Don’t come the raw prawn with me, mate”.

White-faced Heron
White-faced Heron (Ardea novaehollandiae)

I had trouble identifying this Common Tern at first because I thought it might have been a White-fronted Tern but I was wrong, again, D’oh!

Common Tern
Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)

After that, I left Mark to it, he was going back to the sandspit to wait for the waders to come and feed there. Two hours after high tide is the best time to go there.

Stockton Bird List 12/01/10

Superb Fairy-wren
Eastern Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Silver Gull
Australian White Ibis
Rock Dove
Pied Oystercatcher
Mangrove Gerygone
Common Myna
Little Pied Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Red-capped Plover
Intermediate Egret
Red-necked Stint
White-faced Heron
Spotted Turtle-dove
Pacific Golden Plover
Grey-tailed Tattler
Australian Pelican
Olive-backed Oriole
Common Tern
Red Knot
Crested Tern

January 11, 2010

The Drip Gorge, Goulburn River

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The Drip Gorge, Goulburn River

11th January, 2010.

After the heat of yesterday at the Travelling Stock Route between Mudgee and Gulgong, today was a blessed relief with overcast skies and lots cooler weather. I drove to Gulgong and stopped off to buy some bread and had a beer at the rustic pub across the road. A thunderstorm was brewing towards the north and I saw a few flashes of lightning. I reached The Drip Gorge on the banks of the Goulburn River and read my book for a while before the rain came pelting down.

Just on dusk I saw something fly into a tree near me. It was making a low “oom oom” call so I thought it might have been a bronzewing because I have been sucked in before with this sub-bass snarl call. But when I had a good look, I saw that it was some kind of owl. I ran and grabbed the camera and took a few photos with my onboard flash. I don’t have a spotlight but I do not how how I could have used it by myself, anyway. The photos came out too dark, so I had to bump the exposure up by about 2 stops. I think this is a Tawny Frogmouth, but I really do not have a clue. Can you tell me what it is?

Owl, ID please.
Tawny Frogmouth, Marbled Frogmouth ? ID please?

The next morning I had a relaxing breakfast and let the birds come to me. I was feeling very lazy this morning. I was not even going to take out the camera, but I saw this Noisy Friarbird with his dinner. I have no idea what it is. It looks like some massive spider or something, or a fish? But I thought they were honey eaters and did not eat animals/bugs etc.. He seemed to be posing with it, saying “Look what I got, aren’t I clever?”.

Noisy Friarbird
Noisy Friarbird

There were a couple of other birds – an Olive-backed Oriole, a few honeyeaters and a Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, but that was about it. Oh, and a male Superb Fairy-wren who came right up to me when I was eating my muesli. He was about less than a metre from me. Maybe he wanted a cuppa tea? I eventually finished my desultory bird watching episode and headed off down the road. At the Golden Highway, I thudded to a halt because I saw a Wedge-tailed Eagle over the highway. I jumped out, grabbed my camera and hurriedly guessed my exposure setting and shot away. The back lighting was pretty horrendous and I was way underexposed, so I cranked up the contrast just a bit too much I think. What do you reckon? hmmm.

Wedge-tailed Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle (Aquila audax)

Anyhow, here is a shot of the under side of the wings with the contrast not so extreme. You can see how washed out it looks. Its a shame because its the closest I have been to them. doh!

Wedge-tailed Eagle

Tomorrow I should be back in Newcastle and in the morning I might have a look at Walka Water Works which is to the north of Maitland, where I am right now.

January 10, 2010

Travelling Stock Route Number 21

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Travelling Stock Route Number 21

The Travelling Stock Route #21 is on the road between Mudgee and Gulgong on the banks of the Cudgegong River. From Mudgee it is about 14kms. It was quite hot when I got there so I found a nice shady tree and read a book. When the sun went down a bit I headed out to have a look for some birds. There were quite a few Dollarbirds about. They seem to sit on the tallest trees and fly about here and there and then come back to these high perches.

Dollarbird
Dollarbird

On the other side of the river I spotted a mob of White-winged Choughs. A Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike was in the tree and I saw a few of them in the last couple of days hunting for grasshoppers as I did the Sacred Kingfishers. One of the fishermen even told me a kingfisher had taken his bait when he cast out.

Sacred Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

I did see and hear a Restless Flycatcher but the perches he was on were a bit too dark for a decent photo. I could hear their scissors-grinder call all afternoon. Down the river a bit, I spotted a nest and a Willy Wagtail came along and sat in it. I could not see any eggs or chicks in it, but that does not mean anything.

Willy Wagtail
Willy Wagtail on nest

A few Grey Shrike-thrush made their appearances a few times and some Galahs, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and a Little Pied Cormorant flew past. On the water there was not much, just a Dusky Moorhen or two, a few Australian Wood Duck and Pacific Black Duck. The Red-rumped Parrots were flying around in the paddocks and perching on the trees occasionally. They also like to sit on logs in the river.

Red-rumped Parrot
male Red-rumped Parrot

I was trying to get a photo of some dragonflys on the river. Some were stationary and there were a few on the wing. I tried to photograph them on the wing and this is what I came up with. What do you reckon? Its a bit dark, but I had to make the background dark so I could get a decent shutter speed.

Dragonfly
Dragonfly

Travelling Stock Route #21 bird list

Dollarbird
Peaceful Dove
Willy Wagtail
White-winged Chough
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Restless Flycatcher
White-throated Treecreeper
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Super Fairy-wren
Sacred Kingfisher
Red-rumped Parrot
Grey Shrike-thrush
Little Pied Cormorant
Galah
Australian Reed-warbler
Dusky Moorhen
White-plumed Honeyeater
Pacific Black Duck
Laughing Kookaburra
Noisy Miner
Australian Raven
Pied Currawong
Eastern Rosella
Crested Pigeon
Crested Shrike-tit

January 9, 2010

Wilbetree Road Bridge – Mudgee

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Wilbetree Road Bridge, Mudgee

8th & 9th January 2010

To get to the Wilbetree Road Bridge, starting from the clock in Mudgee, go down Market Street and keep going along the road to Gulgong for about 3kms. Turn right at Wilbetree Road and then go about 7kms down the road till you get to the bridge over the Cudgegong River. There is a great shady place to park and have some lunch or a picnic. I went to have a look at the side of the river bank, and then just walked across the bridge a few times. When I got there, I saw Eastern Rosella, kookaburras, Superb Fairy-wrens, Dollarbirds high up in the trees, and a Mistletoebird right by my camp. There were quite a few of these young ones. I think they are Grey Shrike-thrush, but I am not totally sure. Maybe they are immature whistlers? Please comment if you know. 🙂

Grey Shrike-thrush ?
Grey Shrike-thrush ?

I was quite surprised to see some Silvereye lurking in the willow trees by the Cudgegong River. The Dusky Woodswallows were having a whale of a time chasing each other through the trees and performing hair-raising aerobatics. They really are wonderful fliers. This little skink was sitting on top of one of the bridge stanchions having a sun bake.

Lizard
Skink

There were some Peaceful Doves feeding on the sides of the road and a Crested Shrike-tit was feeding on the She-Oak tree right near the bridge, but I could not get a decent photo of him as he was always behind the leaves. Why do trees have so many leaves? Then the Willy Wagtails had a huge fight with a White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike and drove him away from “their” tree. I did get a visit from this colourful bird. Top marks for that special splash of colour!

Red-browed Finch
Red-browed Finch

I think this Shining Bronze-cuckoo is quite young as the chest bars have hardly developed at all. What do you think?

Shining Bronze-cuckoo
Shining Bronze-cuckoo (Chrysococcyx lucidus)

There were not many water birds, just a couple of Dusky Moorhens, Pacific Black Ducks and some Australian Wood Ducks. At one stage I heard this great commotion in the water and it looked to me like an evil carp had tried to eat a Dusky Moorhen. There was a big splash and a huge hullaballoo. These Red-rumped Parrots were jumping up and down as well on the sidelines.

Red-rumped Parrots
Red-rumped Parrots (Psephotus haemaonotus).

As it got later a few White-throated Treecreepers were hanging upside down on the branches and the Sacred Kingfishers were having a good look for a feed along the river. This one was getting harrassed by the Dusky Woodswallows.

Sacred Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

I took this photo of this tortoise in Mudgee at the riverside park where the weir is. He looks like he is covered in green felt.

Tortoise
Tortoise

Wilbetree Road Bird List

Eastern Rosella
Laughing Kookaburra
Superb Fairy-wren
Dollarbird
Mistletoebird
Galah
White-plumed HOneyeater
Silvereye
Dusky Moorhen
Dusky Woodswallow
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Willy Wagtail
Peaceful Dove
Crested Shrike-tit
Grey Shrike-thrush
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Red-browed Finch
Australian Wood Duck
Shining Bronze-cuckoo
Pacific Black Duck
Australian Raven
Welcome Swallow
Sacred Kingfisher
White-throated Treecreeper
Red-rumped Parrot
Common Starling
Australian Magpie
White-faced Heron
Pied Currawong

January 8, 2010

Avisford Nature Reserve, Mudgee

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Avisford Nature Reserve

7th & 8th January 2010.

Avisford Nature Reserve is towards the south of Mudgee in the Mid-West of New South Wales, just behind the Blue Mountains. Its a bit complicated to explain how to get there, so its best to ask at the Tourist Information Office in Mudgee. They are very friendly and helpful there, and make sure you get the Birding Routes for Mudgee whilst there.

Yesterday afternoon I started off at the gates and wandered down to the first weir, where a couple of Pacific Black Duck were paddling around. A few Superb Fairy-wren twittered around the edges as well. By that time, a thunderstorm was brewing. It has been doing this for the past four days. I thought it might blow over, so I carried on nonchalantly. This cute little Grey Butcherbird was sheltering from the coming storm near the road.

Grey Butcherbird
Grey Butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus)

After I took his photo, the rain came pelting down, so I took shelter under his tree. Luckily I had a plastic bag for the camera(I always take one, you never know when it might rain). There were a few magpies and kookaburras singing some glorious tunes after the rain went, so I carried on down the road, past the dam with no water, until I saw this Leaden Flycatcher.

Leaden Flycatcher
Leaden Flycatcher (Myiagra rubecula)

Later on, the female flew right above me. There was also a heap of Striated Thornbills who were jumping around like hyperactive kids.

Striated Thornbill
Striated Thornbill (Acanthiza lineata)

There were quite a few birds around in one particular area in the gully I was walking up – White-eared Honeyeater, Rufous Whistler, Yellow-faced Honeyeater, White-plumed Honyeaters and Noisy Miner.

The next morning I was into it by 7am. I started off by seeing a Common Blackbird. I had never seen one before, so I was pretty happy to see such a common bird. I am a bit suss of the scientific name, though!

Common Blackbird
Common Blackbird (Turdus merula)

I kept on following the gully up and up along this little stream. It was quite nice just walking along this little babbling brook – almost Arcadian. I happened to surprise this fox on a hillside. He was a pretty large boy, I thought he was a wild dog for a while.

Fox
male Fox

I got to the end of my trail and sat down for a rest. I heard this noise, then looked over and saw these wild mountain goats with big horns and billy goat gruff beards. I had never seen wild goats like these out in the bush before. I am not too pleased about the presence of so many feral animals in a nature reserve. There were thousands of rabbits, 3 goats and a fox, and that is just what I saw in an afternoon and a morning. Most National Parks and Nature Reserves in New South Wales have a major presence of feral animals in them. Its not a good look.

Feral Goats
Feral Goats

I headed back down the gully and spotted a Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, White-throated Treecreeper and this female Common Bronzewing.

Common Bronzewing
Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera)

Back at the gates, I saw some Red-browed Finch, Crimson Rosella, Brown Cuckoo-dove, Galahs and a Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike. The Avisford Nature Reserve is well worth a visit. There are quite a number of decent birds and I was there in the middle of summer. I reckon it would be well worth a visit in the spring.

Avisford Nature Reserve Bird List

Superb Fairy-wren
Pacific Black Duck
Willy Wagtail
Grey Fantail
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Treecreeper
Crimson Rosella
Striated Thornbill
Buff-rumped Thornbill
Leaden Flycatcher
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Rufous Whistler
Common Blackbird
Peaceful Dove
Common Bronzewing
Brown Cuckoo-dove
Shining Bronze-cuckoo
Red-browed Finch
Galah
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

Feral Animals

1 Fox
3 Goats
1000’s Rabbits

January 7, 2010

Ferntree Gully

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Ferntree Gully

6th to 7th January, 2010.

Ferntree Gully is on the road from Rylstone to Bylong. If you are coming from Mudgee, take the road to Lue and turn right before you get to Rylstone. I got there in the early afternoon and spent a few hours reading my book before I ventured down into the gully. All afternoon I could hear the male Superb Lyrebird making all his calls and imitations trying to lure a mate to his pile of leaves. One of the giveaways that it is a Superb Lyrebird is the metallic whirring and a deep thudding.

Ferntree Gully
Ferntree Gully

Down in the gully itself I was quite amazed at the vegetation. Its like some kind of primordial rainforest. Up on top of the hill the country is very dry and sparse. I saw a few White-throated Treecreepers and Golden Whistler and did happen to see a female Superb Lyrebird scratching around in the ground. I caught sight of a few Rufous Fantails but failed to get a photo as they move around so fast. All I got was a reddish blur on a tree. There is a boardwalk at the bottom and you get to walk in amongst some very large ferns.

The next morning I went to the track through the bush and along the top of the gully. At camp there were a couple of Crimson Rosella and when I reached the edge of the gully I spotted about three or four Gang-gang Cockatoos. This was a first time for me. This one here is a mature male.

Gang-gang Cockatoo
Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum)

I did also see an Eastern Spinebill, but I was expecting to see more honeyeaters as there was massive amounts of blossom on the eucalyptus trees. I did also happen to see and get a record shot of a Rockwarbler or Origma (Origma solitaria). This was a first for me, so that was two ticks in one day. I was stoked. I followed the Lookouts Trail back to the picnic area and all of a sudden this female Superb Lyrebird jumps in front of me on the track. So I had to take its photo. These were the best shots I had got of a lyrebird so far. They are extremely difficult birds to photograph as they are always in amongst the undergrowth and the light is usually horrendous.

Superb Lyrebird
female Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

Back at the picnic area I heard a male doing its song and dance so I went to look for it, but as soon as I got close it shut up and I could not find it. Aborigines called the Superb Lyrebird Beleck-Beleck, Bullan-Bullan, Buln-Buln, Balangara and Woorayl.

“The shimmering, shining tail of the displaying male lyrebird in the subdued light of the forest is an enchanting sight, and the magnificence of his voice overwhelming, especially when heard for the first time. His shouts can be heard a kilometre distant, advertising his presence. He mimics the songs of other birds of the forest in quick succession, interspersing his own song.” – Pauline Reilly in ‘The Lyrebird – A Natural History’.

Ferntree Gully Bird List

Grey Fantail
Superb Lyrebird
White-throated Treecreeper
Brown Thornbill
Golden Whistler
White-browed Scrubwren
Rufous Fantail
Satin Bowerbird
Laughing Kookaburra
Crimson Rosella
Rockwarbler (Origma)
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Gang-gang Cockatoo
Eastern Yellow Robin
Australian Magpie

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